Dominionism link with Chaplaincy

Like former Australian Christian Lobby managing director, Jim Wallace,  Dave Hodgson is a former member of the SAS (Rhodesian rather than Australian). Hodgson, a ‘committed Christian’ is the founder and CEO of the $50 million property development and acquisitions Paladin Group of Companies..

Like the Australian Christian Lobby, Hodgson appears to subscribe to the dominionist 7 Mountains strategy for reclaiming ‘the culture’ for God. I wrote about this some time ago for ABC’s Religion & Ethics.

7 mountains

Next week, Hodgson is the special guest speaker at a fundraising dinner for Sunshine Coast chaplains. It is a connection between chaplaincy and dominionist theology which helps to confirm what I believe is the underlying purpose of the chaplaincy program; to use Australia’s state schools as a means of recruiting an ‘army for God’. And, if you think this makes me sound nuttier than a fruitcake, please reserve your judgement and read on.

The Reclaiming 7 Mountains project* is no conspiracy theory. It’s  a strategy which has been successfully employed in places like Nigeria and Uganda; places where homosexuals now live in fear of their lives, and children are burned as witches under the influence of the fundamentalist Western zealots who have infiltrated and colonised those cultures and mentored locals into perpetuating the particular prejudices of the Pentecostal and Apostolic churches. It’s also working pretty effectively in the USA where fundamentalist Christians have infiltrated and taken over the Republican Party.Why ever would we think they’re not also at work here in Australia?

Indeed, Hodgson’s interest is in raising money to advance exactly this kind of project in Australia.

“Dave has spent the last seven years funding strategic areas of the Kingdom of God, activating others to do the same, and counselling the believers to impact the marketplace.”

In this context, Hodgson lectures for the Australian Christian Lobby sponsored Compass program (not to be confused with the television show of the same name).

Regular readers of this blog will recall the Compass program seeks out talented Christian students in schools and universities in order to mentor them into positions of power  in education, the public service, government, business, the arts and entertainment, et cetera: the 7 Mountains of Culture.

Director, David Yates explains that in setting up Compass , the Australian Christian Lobby, was “thinking about 15 to 20 years down the track, who will be in the media, education, politics, law, and history?”

“If you can get through government and policy makers then it can influence laws and it can have a disproportionate effect within the culture,” Yates explains.

Since I published this post, the following comment has been made by a reader. I thought it important enough to bring it into the main text of this article.  Posting as ‘theconsciencevote’, the reader says:

“While she was at high school, my eldest daughter was targeted for recruitment by the Compass program. After initial contact (and conversion) at Planetshakers events, they told her that God had a plan for her life, which was to graduate high school, go to a nominated Bible college, work as a youth pastor for a few years then become involved in politics. The ultimate aim, they said, was for her to represent the Kingdom of God in the Federal Parliament – and she would be supported by a prayer circle to keep ‘demons’ from sabotaging her mission.

Their message was very well-tailored; tell a teenager they’re special, that they’re chosen, that the disengagement or frustration they feel is due to an external force holding them back from their ‘true’ potential, and that here is a group of warm and friendly people who understand them and want to help them.”

It took a lot to convince her that she was being manipulated. Luckily, her fellow Christian students overstepped the mark and tried to ‘exorcise the demons put about her by her family’. That opened her eyes.”

Compass operates in line with the strategy to infiltrate and conquer the 7 Mountains of Culture.

Until I started writing about this, the Australian Christian Lobby’s support was openly acknowledged on the 7 Mountains website – but, in the manner of these things, has since been deleted. Never mind. I took a screenshot.

ACL - Reclaim 7 Mountains cropped

 

Here is an overview of the 7 Mountains movement:

And here’s Dave Hodgson:

I think the similarities are obvious.

Hodgson presents for all the world like a General in an army which seeks, by infilitration rather than violence, to commandeer the world’s secular and non-Christian governments and install Christian administrations. If you’ve ever turned up to a Parents and Citizens’ group meeting at your local school and found that every member is also a member of the local evangelical church, you’ll be familiar with how the system works.

The goal, outlined in the Reclaim 7 Mountains movement, is to  create a ‘Kingdom of God’ here on earth. Some Christians believe, that until this is achieved, Christ will not return.

Originally, the Australian Christian Lobby was an offshoot of Pat Robertson’s Christian Coalition of America. So, it’s not coincidental that, in his book,  The New World Order (p. 227), Robertson explains:

“There will never be world peace until God’s house and God’s people are given their rightful place of leadership at the top of the world. How can there be peace when drunkards, drug dealers, communists, atheists, New Age worshipers of Satan, secular humanists, oppressive dictators, greedy money changers, revolutionary assassins, adulterers, and homosexuals are on top?”

And the strategy is to change the power balance. As 7 Mountains advocate, ‘Apostle’ Bill Hamon warns:

“God is preparing His Church to become an invincible, unstoppable, unconquerable, overcoming Army of the Lord that subdues everything under Christ’s feet. There will be a sovereign restorational move of God to activate all that is needed for His army to be and do what He had eternally purposed.

…God’s great end-time army is being prepared to execute God’s written Judgments with Christ’s victory and divine judgment decrees that have already been established in heaven.  The time is set when they will be administered and executed on earth through God’s saintly army.  All that is destined and needed will be activated during God’s restorational Army of the Lord Movement.”

This is obviously a long-term project and many soldiers are needed to fight in this coming Christian army. Where better to recruit them than in schools?  As former Scripture Union CEO, Tim Mander says:

“To have a full-time Christian presence in government schools in this ever-increasing secular world is an unbelievable privilege. Here is the church’s opportunity to make a connection with the one place through which every young person must attend: our schools.”

Similarly, chaplaincy provider, Access Ministries‘ great interest in ‘making disciples’.

Note the emphasis in Mander’s quote is on the value of chaplaincy to Scripture Union, not the value of chaplains to the children.  Note the negative connotation on the ‘ever-increasing secular world’ . These people don’t see secularism as something which protects freedom of religion and belief but as something which stands in the way of a Christian theocratic government.

I firmly believe that school chaplaincy is a part of this dominionist drive to recruit soldiers to the cause.

Yeah, I know. It sounds like some massive conspiracy theory, doesn’t it? Yet, here’s school chaplain, Wendy Boniface:

Boniface - Jordan

 

“A great article. I have just begun a certificate 4 chaplaincy course(last week) to teach me how to be Christ in the world, workplace etc and I thought as I was learning all these skills that this is what every Christian should be learning to equip us to advance the kingdom of God. The good news is the chaplaincy movement is growing quickly and it seems to be a way of getting out of the pews and into the community. I feel like I’ve finally crossed the Jordan River and am about to take territory at last!”

“Taking territory” is classic 7 Mountains/dominionist language and it’s intimately linked with recruiting young people to fight for the cause. In an interview on a Christian television station in the US, leader of the 7 Mountains movement, Lance Wallnau explains:

“The Seven Mountains are – it’s almost like its a template for warfare.  Because the church so frequently does not have a language for how it goes about taking territory…The Seven Mountains is not my message.  I think its a mandate given to me from Loren Cunningham and Bill Bright spiritually.  Because these two titans in evangelism took youth movements, young people, whether it was Youth With A Mission with Loren or Campus Crusade with Bill Bright.  And they literally mobilized the next generation in their day to go evangelize the world.   God visited those two men and showed them seven kingdoms, seven mountains, that if they would focus on it, the next generation could take nations.”

They are looking to the next generation; thus, the focus on gaining access to kids in schools through measures like Compass and school chaplaincy. It is a strategic drive to conquer by infiltration and stealth and our government is funding it!

The aim is to ‘take territory’ by ‘invading systems’. Consider: 3,000 chaplains in Australia’s state schools at a cost (spent and committed) of three-quarters of a billion taxpayers’ dollars.

I’d say the Australian education system has been pretty successfully invaded.

Chrys Stevenson

 

*In fairness, it’s important to note that, at this link, the Reclaiming 7 Mountains project rejects the notion that it is dominionist. I would argue, as would many others, that their rhetoric suggests otherwise.

 

Just in:

“Working with children, introducing them to Jesus and helping them to grow and discover Jesus as their Lord and Savior is a wonderful privilege. Helping children discover they have gifts that can be used to introduce others to Jesus is a vital task. Max7 provides resources for leaders to reach and disciple children and young people across the globe.” – Leanne Palmer, Christian Education Program Manager at ACCESS ministries.

 

 

 

37 thoughts on “Dominionism link with Chaplaincy

  1. theconsciencevote

    While she was at high school, my eldest daughter was targeted for recruitment by the Compass Program. After initial contact (and conversion) at Planetshakers events, they told her that God had a plan for her life, which was to graduate high school, go to a nominated Bible college, work as a youth pastor for a few years then become involved in politics. The ultimate aim, they said, was for her to represent the Kingdom of God in the Federal Parliament – and she would be supported by a prayer circle to keep ‘demons’ from sabotaging her mission.

    Their message was very well-tailored; tell a teenager they’re special, that they’re chosen, that the disengagement or frustration they feel is due to an external force holding them back from their ‘true’ potential, and that here is a group of warm and friendly people who understand them and want to help them.

    It took a lot to convince her that she was being manipulated. Luckily, her fellow Christian students overstepped the mark and tried to ‘exorcise the demons put about her by her family’. That opened her eyes.

    Reply
  2. onemeremember

    Why is it when a so-called Christian has a spiritual experience (?) they assume it is from their God? Why couldn’t it be from Satan (?). They seem to believe in both. Why is it that when their God is supposed to have made this whole kit and caboodle that He then has to turn around and infiltrate the minds of those who think differently? He made them as well, didn’t he? Wasn’t the whole thing supposed to be about abundance and diversification? The logic of these mentally ill individuals is just mind-blowingly absurd. As far as I’m concerned if one God Botherer is in any way associated with anyone being murdered because the person thought differently or practised a different life-style etc., they should be up for Accessory to Murder. Until this starts to happen I can’t see these nonsense being abated. Christian Soldiers? That was supposed to have gone out with the Crusades, for goodness sakes.

    Reply
  3. crj4Carol

    There has been an invasion and this is a war. I don’t think that he majority of parents really understand what is going on here. There are many who went to Sunday school themselves but don’t practice any religion now who think that it is harmless. It isn’t. They don’t understand how the focus has changed from the mainstream to fundamentalism. There should be no religion of any kind in state schools. Some people also assume that there are ethics classes available as an alternative. I don’t have a problem with that, although, as a lifetime atheist, I resent the fact that it is necessary – it sort of suggests that without religion people won’t behave in a moral way. This is nonsense!

    Reply
  4. Vance

    http://www.cityedgechurch.org.au/kingdom_investors.php

    Dave Hodgson can be heard here talking about the “demise of Christian values in our nation”, and the “need to transfer our culture back to the Kingdom of God”. He also claims that he knows how to “mathematically destroy evolution”.

    Here’s an example of Dave’s analytical brilliance …

    “God gave everybody a conscience. We’re born with a conscience. Even the secular people. ‘Conscience’ means con-science – contrary to science. Science doesn’t understand what conscience means. They don’t go together, right.”

    If anyone’s curious, the Kingdom Investors podcasts are available on iTunes. Titles include, ‘Spiritual Dominion’, ‘Know Your Enemy’, and ‘Obedience to the Assignment’.

    Reply
    1. alpharia

      I don’t even….

      I think the appropriate response to this interpretation of the etymology of conscience should be left to a very underused though brilliant quote by Henry de Montherlant.

      “Stupidity does not consist in being without ideas. Such stupidity would be the sweet, blissful stupidity of animals, molluscs and the gods. Human stupidity consists in having lots of ideas, but stupid ones.”

      Reply
  5. palmboy

    Pure evil people who have no concern about the harm they are causing innocent people. They are only concerned about their own distorted reality, which they pursue at all costs. To exploit innocent vulnerable children is emotional abuse.

    Reply
  6. Colin Mackay

    The departments above the seven mountains bear some thought:
    Kingdom of gud (theocrats)
    Government, what they want to sieze, they already have the structures in place and people embedded or groomed.
    Wealth Warfare and Teaching
    Wealth should come as no surprise the amway (big database) DeVosses provide a shit load of finance, they’re definitely doing business, and government business is a big part of it. Justice dept. programs, prison ministries, chaplins,… the usual stuff as well. Oh and blackwater, Xe, whatever it is now. The biggest private army in the world DeVoss/North.
    Warfare, these are old cold war warriors, think Santamaria for a proximate. NSA style Psyops, Commsec, Noisy investigations (same as scientology in effect) A full blown military operation, hence the close ties to elite military personnel. As an aside, I wonder if any atheists work for the nsa, asd etal?
    Teaching; good old testament coercive thought reform (torture) and stoning. They got it all!

    Reply
  7. Colin Mackay

    Bit of a follow on. Cindy Jacobs was over here a year or two ago consulting on strategy. She visited Qld and Western Australia. Interesting the rise of PUP and the minors through some clever preference deals. Ballots go missing, electoral commissioners falling on their swords. If I wanted ‘influence’ the electoral commission would be a fine place to start. And we have Jeff Shaw in Victoria doing his best to destabilise government, and seeking the power to make judicial appointments. A quite word in the premiers ear if not, a no confidence motion. We’re in trouble alright!

    Reply
    1. Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear: Assorted Rants on Religion, Science, Politics and Philosophy from a bear of very little brain Post author

      There is also an organised infiltration of fundamentalists in the field of medicine. We know of a doctor who has campaigned for voluntary euthanasia being stitched up and wrongly dismissed on the ‘evidence’ and instructions of a group of medicos closely associated with Opus Dei. The doctor will win the wrongful dismissal case – it’s laughable – but they’ve majorly disrupted this person’s life.

      I understand fundamentalist doctors form ‘cabals’ – only referring to specialists within the cabal who practice medicine in accordance with Biblical law. Of course their patients are never told that their care is god-centred not patient focused.

      Reply
      1. theconsciencevote

        And let’s not forget ‘Doctors for the Family’, and their anti-marriage equality ‘study’ last year. The media did no background on them whatsoever – it took me about ten minutes to find out that they were a Dominionist group backed up by the Australian Christian Lobby, pushing their religious agenda as medical science.

        http://consciencevote.com.au/2012/05/13/who-are-doctors-for-the-family/

        http://consciencevote.com.au/2012/05/14/more-on-doctors-for-the-family-and-their-evidence/

      2. Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear: Assorted Rants on Religion, Science, Politics and Philosophy from a bear of very little brain Post author

        I’ve also written about this offensive group on several occasions:

        https://thatsmyphilosophy.wordpress.com/2012/05/13/doctors-for-the-familys-hidden-religious-agenda/
        https://thatsmyphilosophy.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/doctors-for-the-family-debunked/
        https://thatsmyphilosophy.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/dr-catherine-lennon-any-means-to-a-moral-end/
        https://thatsmyphilosophy.wordpress.com/2013/05/23/dr-catherine-lennon-doctors-for-the-family-nsw-hansard/
        https://thatsmyphilosophy.wordpress.com/2012/05/15/i-call-bullshit-mr-wallace-doctors-for-the-family/

  8. Paul

    Conspiracy theory? No proven scientific fact. Christians have been conspiring since the ‘last supper’ to promote the Kingdom of God. At times more organised than others. And the inspiration for it all is benevolent. What greater gift can a believer give to another than to save his/her eternal soul from the fires of hell? How could one refrain from proselytising when to do so condemns those little children to eternal damnation.

    Reply
  9. Paul

    “Onward Christian Soldiers marching as to war, with the cross of Jesus, going on before.”
    Words I learned in Sunday School in the 1950’s in the Congregational Church, perhaps the least militant denomination.
    It is war, war on Satan. War to establish the Kingdom of God.
    No wonder Abbott wants to fund Chaplains to further the Kingdom of God. No wonder he admitted he would do ANYTHING to become PM.
    He was chosen by God to become PM and turn Australia into a Christian Country.

    Reply
  10. Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear: Assorted Rants on Religion, Science, Politics and Philosophy from a bear of very little brain Post author

    To be fair, Paul, this dominionism thing is a Protestant, not a Catholic movement and I think the Catholics are probably happy to capitalise on any opportunity to have influence, but don’t seem to be caught up in the overall strategy.

    So I don’t think this is a campaign that the Prime Minister is involved with or even aware of, probably. The best information I can get on Abbott from those close to him is that he is not particularly religious and that he is a political animal through and through. His religion is entirely secondary to his political ambitions.

    So, for the Prime Minister and his government, chaplaincy will exist for as long as it suits them politically. I suspect they know that Federally it’s in its death throes and will be able to spin it so it looks like they tried to save it, but have been forced by evil atheists and leftists into abandoning it.

    I’m happy to advance what sounds like a conspiracy theory where I have evidence, but I don’t want to overstate it either.

    Reply
    1. theconsciencevote

      Religion’s a tool for Abbott, just as it was for Howard – and even Rudd, to a lesser degree. There are several politicians who attend Hillsong or other Pentecostal/fundamentalist churches (notably, Social Services Minister Kevin Andrews), and major party leaders pander to the Australian Christian Lobby every election by answering a long questionnaire about their intentions regarding the ACL’s big ticket issues (marriage equality, abortion, etc).

      It’s going back a bit, but Marion Maddox’s God Under Howard does a fine job of untangling the relationships and the kind of political influence that such groups wield.

      Reply
  11. Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear: Assorted Rants on Religion, Science, Politics and Philosophy from a bear of very little brain Post author

    One of my proudest moments was when Marion Maddox stood up at a conference and began her speech, “Chrys Stevenson says the Australian Christian Lobby is dominionist …”

    I gasped and held my breath – dreading what would come next. Was I about to be ripped asunder by the great Marion Maddox?

    “Chrys Stevenson is absolutely right,” she said.

    My sigh of relief was audible and I think I grinned for the rest of the week.😉

    Reply
  12. Annette

    Yes, the dominionists’ ambitions are based on their postmillenialism, a subset of protestant end times beliefs. Catholicism is against millennialism of any kind.

    Reply
    1. Vance

      In one of his podcasts (‘Spiritual Dominion’), Dave Hodgson talks to his audience of business people – aka the “Kings” – about being “called to control the end-time harvest” … “Storehouses of wealth is what we are ultimately called to control for the end-time harvest”.

      “We must be mature enough,” he says, “to handle the wealth when it comes our way, so we don’t waste it. Especially in these end times because it takes too long to replace the individuals, the Kings”.

      Of course, Satan is constantly plotting against them … “Obviously the Devil doesn’t want us anywhere near that stuff”.

      Reply
      1. Annette

        Says more about them than about the veracity or otherwise of their teachings I reckon.

      2. onemeremember

        I’m sitting here shaking my head at all the nonsense Hodgson goes on with his indirect claims of being on a mission for God. I wonder what he would say to this chap who has been researching remains in South Africa and some of his suggestions. He actually makes more sense to me that all this drivel Hodgson is going on with. Even then, there is a lot of work to be done before his work can be taken as fact. It may turn out to be the wrong hypothesis but at least it makes more sense than what Hodgson is basing his grab for wealth on. Personally I find Hodgson’s sort of fundamentalism frightening. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NiVROBhwHUM

  13. Robster

    Dominion? Less than 7% of Aussies attend church once a month or more. We’re hardly a pious bunch. Twenty five percent (approx) declare their atheism. Non believers are a bigger more dominant force than the 6% that believe enough to attend worship the sky fairy services. They want to climb seven mountains, they need to get over a small hill first. Got to love their positive, I would say deluded plans to dominate.

    Reply
    1. Gladly, the Cross-Eyed Bear: Assorted Rants on Religion, Science, Politics and Philosophy from a bear of very little brain Post author

      I agree, it’s easy to dismiss dominionism as a threat given that the Australian population is clearly on a trajectory towards a majority being non-religious. However, Robster, you have to remember that you don’t need a “majority” in order to have influence or power. You only need to have the balance of power, or factional power.

      Thus, as I have written elsewhere – https://newmatilda.com/2012/06/13/happy-clappers-who-run-queensland – a faction within the Liberal National Party in Queensland has a huge influence on that party’s policies.

      In the NSW Parliament, Fred Nile holds the balance of power. His party will never have a majority, but he is in a position to throw his weight around and horse-trade with peoples’ rights.

      Similarly, when Brian Harradine held the balance of power in the Federal Parliament, he was able to be far more influential on policy than a single vote would suggest.

      In schools – especially now that there is an argument to give principals far more autonomy over hiring staff – you only need for the Principal to be a fundamentalist Christian for quiet preference to be given to teachers with similar beliefs.

      A population of Christians don’t have to represent a majority in an electorate to be influential. If they can be persuaded to vote together, even a minority group can tip the balance in a marginal seat, so may be worth a politician cultivating with sympathetic policies and porkbarrel programs.

      The point is, this is not about numbers. This is about the politics of power and influence. They don’t need to ‘run’ the government or public instituitions (although that is clearly their intention) in order to have a profound impact upon them to the detriment of the rest of us.

      Reply
    2. Vance

      “Non believers are a bigger more dominant force than the 6% that believe enough to attend worship the sky fairy services.”

      Yeah, that would be the same dominant force of nonbelievers who sat back and watched as the chaplaincy program spread throughout the nation’s public schools. And then voted in the most overtly theocratic federal government we’ve had for quite some time.

      Reply

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